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I have 26 consecutive profitable trades of 15% or better. How is this possible? Every day there are hundreds of stocks setting new highs, no matter what happens in the overall market. Many of these stocks are still at very reasonable valuations. Afraid of buying stocks at their highs? Think of it this way: a new high is really a future floor for companies with solid financial underpinnings. Quantitative momentum modeling makes it easy to identify stocks that can continue this upward momentum trend. Why does this happen? It's really very simple..ask me about what investors and cows have in common. I am $$$ MR. MARKET $$$. I AM HUGE!!! Bring me your finest meats and cheeses. You can join in on the fun. Register for free and you'll be able to post messages on this forum and also receive emails when $$$ MR. MARKET $$$ makes his own trades. ($$$MR. MARKET$$$ is a proprietary investor and does not provide individual financial advice. The stocks mentioned on this forum do not represent individual buy or sell recommendations and should not be viewed as such. Individual investors should consider speaking with a professional investment adviser before making any investment decisions.)
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  1. #201
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    Boy, ZM, TDOC, WORK, DDOG, EDIT all bucking the trend today. Some others.

  2. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louetta View Post
    Boy, ZM, TDOC, WORK, DDOG, EDIT all bucking the trend today. Some others.
    Yeah, and Iím kicking myself because I was waiting to pull the trigger on doubling down on TDOC and ZM. Iíll either have to wait for a little pullback or just go ahead and buy into their strength.

  3. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWolf View Post
    Yeah, and Iím kicking myself because I was waiting to pull the trigger on doubling down on TDOC and ZM. Iíll either have to wait for a little pullback or just go ahead and buy into their strength.
    Maybe it wasnít such a bad thing after all. Getting pummelled today.

  4. #204
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    Well, I donít think we are going to see an end to this downtrend until the CoronaVirus is somewhat contained, and that could be quite a while. I definitely feel like I was too aggressive re-entering so soon, but Iím going to ride it out. The jobs report that just came out was strong, but there no doubt that the virus scare is having an impact on the global economy. In any event, no more buying right now, and I donít recommend that anyone take any positions just yet. There will be some incredible buying opportunities when this ends, but I donít see the end of the tunnel yet.

  5. #205
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    Well, as luck would have it the main product of my POTY pick (and one I own), CERS, deactivates coronavirus(es) in donated blood.... so hooray for me? (CERS is up another 3% today, too)

  6. #206
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    If a person believes the market is dead and will never recover then he should get out. If one believes this is a glitch and recovery will eventually turn things around why not hold or buy quality high dividend stocks and harvest the reinvested shares? Assuming there won't be wholesale dividend cuts the return should be the same monthly, quarterly, yearly whether the portfolio is worth 200K or 150K. If you don't have to use the proceeds you'll be rewarded with many more shares when the market recovers be it one, two, or three years.

    --------------------billy

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by billyjoe View Post
    If a person believes the market is dead and will never recover then he should get out. If one believes this is a glitch and recovery will eventually turn things around why not hold or buy quality high dividend stocks and harvest the reinvested shares? Assuming there won't be wholesale dividend cuts the return should be the same monthly, quarterly, yearly whether the portfolio is worth 200K or 150K. If you don't have to use the proceeds you'll be rewarded with many more shares when the market recovers be it one, two, or three years.

    --------------------billy
    That is indeed one defense strategy, BillyJoe, but it typically doesnít generate much income unless your sitting on an extremely large portfolio. It is also a strategy that many retirees use when they want to go into a more cautious mode with the ability to extract income. Personally, Iím not that keen on buying stocks just for their dividends. I do, however, always direct my broker to reinvest the dividend I do get back into the stock because I donít need the income right now.

  8. #208
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    from Marketwatch

    Opinion: Pick up these Ďnext generationí technology stocks while theyíre on sale

    shares of companies like Roku, Twillio, Cree and Chegg have more potential because they are more ďnext generationĒ tech names,

    Published: March 7, 2020 at 11:18 a.m. ET By Michael Brush
    Companies such as Twilio, Chegg and Enphase Energy are the FAANGs of the future, says Kevin Landis of the Firsthand Technology Opportunities Fund
    Tim - Retired Problem Solver

  9. #209
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    Well, crap. What else is there to say about this insane market. I got out at just the right time, but got back in way too early. The good news is that I am still sitting in a far amount of cash, and I intend to keep that powder dry until I see some concrete signs that this thing has bottomed. For now, I am going to hold my long term positions, while I actively trade to cover my drawdown. I wanted to write this post to share my thoughts on strategies you can use when you get caught in a major correction like this. Let me preface these remarks by saying that I am basing my chosen strategy(ies) on the belief that because this correction is not based on economic factors (yet), there will be some significant bounces. I will be shorting, as I did today, but it is in those bounces that I intend to also book a lot of cash. Here are some of the strategies I considered, and my thoughts on them:

    1) Using covered calls.
    Not viable, because I donít hold 100 share increments in all my positions.

    2) Buying protective puts.
    Viable, since I donít have to own stock in 100 shares increments, but difficult to use when you want to spread the risk across your stocks according to the since of your position. You could instead buy some protective puts on some of your holdings, trading or rolling them if the stock prices continues to drop. The downside is that you may be stuck letting them expire worthless, and therefore lose your premium, if you mistime time and the prices of the stocks you are protecting go up. Not for me.

    3) Buying puts against the indices.
    There are a number of ways to do this including puts against index ETFs, e.g. QQQ, SPY, and DIA. This isnít an unreasonable hedge, but again, if the indices head up after youíve bought your puts, the premiums you paid will eat into your stock profits. Again, not for me.

    4) Hedging with positions in closely related stocks.
    This strategy, which is sometimes used by hedge funds in various forms, involves buying or short selling stocks that are different from the stocks you own, but basically in the same segment of the market. A long side hedge is usually used when you have expectations for growth in a market segment, but you are unsure who the ultimate winner is going to be. You therefore go long in multiple competitors to hedge against the chance you picked the wrong company. In the case of a dramatic market downturn like the current one, you short sell competitors in the same segments as the positions you hold to allow the generation of profits while the markets heads south. I actually use the long side of this strategy, but I am not a fan of the short side as I feel strategies 5, 6, and 7 are more fruitful.

    5) Shorting the stocks you own.
    This is called ďshorting against the box.Ē Since most brokers (all that I personally know of) wonít let you short a stock you currently hold long, however, this usually requires opening a separate account from which to short. Like most of the other strategies, this only works if the market continues to head down. If the market heads back up after you have shorted, your short positions will eat into your profits until you close them. This actually works nicely, however, if you are convinced the market is headed much lower. In that case, you let the short positions build up profits until you feel the market has bottomed, and then you close your short positions, and ride the long positions back up. Of course this mean you need to be pretty accurate in calling a bottom, which can be very tough to do. I have not ruled out using this strategy because I am not convinced there wonít be yet more spikes down, but, at the most, I will probably only use this strategy on a selective basis, i.e. for some but not all of my long positions.

    6) Shorting stocks you donít own.
    With this strategy, you are basically just shorting the market. Just like any day and swing trading, you scan for short setups and then short those stocks when they trigger. I definitely plan to use this strategy as I did today.

    7) Playing the long bounces.
    If you are caught in a really rapid, deep correction, as we have been, you can bet there will be some significant bounces. These bounces will provide really great opportunities to generate some profits. The thing to consider here is whether or not you are willing to swing trade long, or just day trade. Since swing trading implies holding your positions overnight, it opens you up to ďgap disease,Ē i.e. gaps up or down in share price at the next dayís open that are caused by overnight news. Personally, there is no way I am going to do anything except day trade, i.e. round trip with a single day, in the current climate. Other than that restriction, I will definitely utilize this strategy.

    I hope this helps someone.
    Last edited by BlueWolf; 03-10-2020 at 07:48 PM.

  10. #210
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    Good write-up. Today another method was suggested to me: the Buffett method. You buy good stocks and hold on through thick and thin. I was, of course, much too well brought up to mention Buffett owns large positions in four airlines and a variety of banks. I did buy some more STOR which is a holding of one of Buffett's lieutenants.

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