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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bay of Rum
    Posts
    309

    Question Off topic question

    I mostly trade with an IRA account, so I don't concern myself with tax consequences. I recently opened a regular brokerage acct & am concerned about capital gains. My question is regarding those nasty capital gains, does anyone know what the rates are? Short term (less than 1 year) & long term(1 year or more) I hear that they were recently lowered or eliminated, I guess I can go to the IRS, but hey, you people should be up on this!

    Thanks,
    Gary on long Island, USA
    99 percent of Politicians give the rest a bad name.

  2. #2
    sisterwin2 Guest

    Default ira account

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary611
    I mostly trade with an IRA account, so I don't concern myself with tax consequences. I recently opened a regular brokerage acct & am concerned about capital gains. My question is regarding those nasty capital gains, does anyone know what the rates are? Short term (less than 1 year) & long term(1 year or more) I hear that they were recently lowered or eliminated, I guess I can go to the IRS, but hey, you people should be up on this!

    Thanks,
    Gary on long Island, USA
    I would like to know how you trade with an IRA account? That seems the way to go for a little girl like me. Could you clue me in.

    Dena

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Keystone Heights, Fla.
    Posts
    454

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary611
    I mostly trade with an IRA account, so I don't concern myself with tax consequences. I recently opened a regular brokerage acct & am concerned about capital gains. My question is regarding those nasty capital gains, does anyone know what the rates are? Short term (less than 1 year) & long term(1 year or more) I hear that they were recently lowered or eliminated, I guess I can go to the IRS, but hey, you people should be up on this!

    Thanks,
    Gary on long Island, USA
    Gary:
    Short-term gains are taxed as ordinary income. Long-term are taxed at 15%.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Keystone Heights, Fla.
    Posts
    454

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sisterwin2
    I would like to know how you trade with an IRA account? That seems the way to go for a little girl like me. Could you clue me in.

    Dena
    Dena:
    An IRA account contains qualified money. Most people who use them for trading are using funds that are rolled over from some other financial institution. Your brokerage house can guide you in transferring the funds. You are prohibited from withdrawing the profits without suffering a penalty and cannot use margin. Other than that, it is pretty much like any other trading account.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    8,893

    Default

    Sisterwin2,
    If you trade on line, the numbered account will say next to it either IRA , SEP IRA, or ROTH IRA. They will ask in advance whether you want to reinvest dividends into stock including fractional shares or keep it in a money market fund in which case it will be totalled in with the dollar value of the stocks you may own. You can keep as much in cash or stocks what ever way you want to balance it. You can't buy on margin with an IRA account. Brokerage fees will be taken out automatically as well as yearly maintenance fees (maybe $30) or you could send a check to cover those fees if you wish. IRA and SEP IRA will be taxed only when you start taking $$ out age 59 1/2 or later. ROTH IRA won't ever be taxed since you pay tax on it before you started the ROTH. They will send you statements telling you what year the contributions were initially made ,but the money is accumulated in a lump sum, not by year of deposit.

    billyjoe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bay of Rum
    Posts
    309

    Thumbs up Thanks!!

    Quote Originally Posted by billyjoe
    Sisterwin2,
    If you trade on line, the numbered account will say next to it either IRA , SEP IRA, or ROTH IRA. They will ask in advance whether you want to reinvest dividends into stock including fractional shares or keep it in a money market fund in which case it will be totalled in with the dollar value of the stocks you may own. You can keep as much in cash or stocks what ever way you want to balance it. You can't buy on margin with an IRA account. Brokerage fees will be taken out automatically as well as yearly maintenance fees (maybe $30) or you could send a check to cover those fees if you wish. IRA and SEP IRA will be taxed only when you start taking $$ out age 59 1/2 or later. ROTH IRA won't ever be taxed since you pay tax on it before you started the ROTH. They will send you statements telling you what year the contributions were initially made ,but the money is accumulated in a lump sum, not by year of deposit.
    billyjoe
    Sis, that says it better than I could put it, basicly your money is put in an IRA thru a brokerage house, & is taxed after age 59 1/2 as you withdraw it, as ordinary income.

    -Gary
    99 percent of Politicians give the rest a bad name.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    SacTown
    Posts
    15,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by billyjoe
    Sisterwin2,
    If you trade on line, the numbered account will say next to it either IRA , SEP IRA, or ROTH IRA. They will ask in advance whether you want to reinvest dividends into stock including fractional shares or keep it in a money market fund in which case it will be totalled in with the dollar value of the stocks you may own. You can keep as much in cash or stocks what ever way you want to balance it. You can't buy on margin with an IRA account. Brokerage fees will be taken out automatically as well as yearly maintenance fees (maybe $30) or you could send a check to cover those fees if you wish. IRA and SEP IRA will be taxed only when you start taking $$ out age 59 1/2 or later. ROTH IRA won't ever be taxed since you pay tax on it before you started the ROTH. They will send you statements telling you what year the contributions were initially made ,but the money is accumulated in a lump sum, not by year of deposit.

    billyjoe
    I never heard of a yearly maintenance fee.

    You can open an IRA, SEP, Roth, Rollover at most any brokerage. But since you cannot margin on one you also have to deal w/ unsettled funds.

    To explain what unsettled funds is...I think I will give an example:

    Let's say that you have $20,000 in an IRA trading account.

    You buy 1000 shares of a stock today for $18,000...Say it costs you 10 bux commish.

    You sell those 1000 shs next Tuesday for $19,000.

    OK...You have the $2000 you never invested and the $19,000 minus $20 commish you paid on the round trip trade. Total $20,980.

    You can trade the $2,000 any way you want including a day trade.

    On that "unsettled" $18,980 you can buy another stock(s) with it on Tuesday after you sold whatever...BUT, you have to wait 3 days to sell it (Takes 3 days to settle the original sale on Tuesday). If you let it settle after the 3 days and don't use it to buy anything...then you can do whatever you want with it...even day trade it.

    BUT WAIT...What happens if you decide to buy w/ unsettled funds on Tuesday and sell on Wednesday before they are settled??? Apparently not much...Because I've done it before and all I ever got was a BIG FAT WARNING EMAIL that if I do it again my account could be restricted. What does restricted mean? Probably different things to different brokers...Maybe, no internet trades for 90 days, no buys w/ unsettled funds for 90 days...Heck, I dunno???...But what's the worst that can happen??? They restrict you in some way...And you pull it out and go to another broker...Don't worry...You are not going to jail...You have violated Federal Reserve Regulation T and taken a "FREE RIDE"...But so what???

    But I have a "SUPER" Big problem w/ this Unsettled Funds thing...Somebody is making money on this rule...And it isn't you or me...Who is REALLY getting the Free Ride??? We had a discussion about this here at Mr. M maybe a year or so ago...I'd volunteer to lead a crusade against this rule...But I was never able to garner enough interest to fight this BIG ripoff policy.

    Next Lesson...How to get around the "Pattern Day Trader" rule...LOL
    "Trade What Is Happening...Not What You Think Is Gonna Happen"

    Find Tomorrow's Winners At SharpTraders.com

    Follow Me On Twitter

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    SacTown
    Posts
    15,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IIC
    I never heard of a yearly maintenance fee.

    You can open an IRA, SEP, Roth, Rollover at most any brokerage. But since you cannot margin on one you also have to deal w/ unsettled funds.

    To explain what unsettled funds is...I think I will give an example:

    Let's say that you have $20,000 in an IRA trading account.

    You buy 1000 shares of a stock today for $18,000...Say it costs you 10 bux commish.

    You sell those 1000 shs next Tuesday for $19,000.

    OK...You have the $2000 you never invested and the $19,000 minus $20 commish you paid on the round trip trade. Total $20,980.

    You can trade the $2,000 any way you want including a day trade.

    On that "unsettled" $18,980 you can buy another stock(s) with it on Tuesday after you sold whatever...BUT, you have to wait 3 days to sell it (Takes 3 days to settle the original sale on Tuesday). If you let it settle after the 3 days and don't use it to buy anything...then you can do whatever you want with it...even day trade it.

    BUT WAIT...What happens if you decide to buy w/ unsettled funds on Tuesday and sell on Wednesday before they are settled??? Apparently not much...Because I've done it before and all I ever got was a BIG FAT WARNING EMAIL that if I do it again my account could be restricted. What does restricted mean? Probably different things to different brokers...Maybe, no internet trades for 90 days, no buys w/ unsettled funds for 90 days...Heck, I dunno???...But what's the worst that can happen??? They restrict you in some way...And you pull it out and go to another broker...Don't worry...You are not going to jail...You have violated Federal Reserve Regulation T and taken a "FREE RIDE"...But so what???

    But I have a "SUPER" Big problem w/ this Unsettled Funds thing...Somebody is making money on this rule...And it isn't you or me...Who is REALLY getting the Free Ride??? We had a discussion about this here at Mr. M maybe a year or so ago...I'd volunteer to lead a crusade against this rule...But I was never able to garner enough interest to fight this BIG ripoff policy.

    Next Lesson...How to get around the "Pattern Day Trader" rule...LOL

    Different brokers have slightly different definitions from what I've seen regarding "Pattern Day Trader" rules. For example...some I've seen include options and others don't. Below is the Q and A from Scottrade which does not exactly jive with the definition at Interactive Brokers:

    http://trimurl.com/3LP


    SCOTTRADE:
    Q. What is the definition of a "Pattern Day Trader"?

    A. The NASD defines a Pattern Day Trader as "any customer who executes four or more day trades within five business days, provided the number of day trades is more than 6% of the total trades in the account during that period".

    Q. Will Pattern Day Traders be required to have a margin account?

    A. Yes, all Pattern Day Traders must have a margin account and will be required to maintain $25,000 equity.

    Q. If I have a margin account but I don't have $25,000 equity, what are the consequences if I day trade four times in a within five business days?

    A. Scottrade must issue a day trading equity call in the amount of the deficiency below $25,000 equity.

    Q. What will happen if I do not meet this day trading equity call?

    A. Scottrade may be forced to close your account, or revoke your margin privileges.

    Q. If funds are deposited to meet a day trading equity call, how soon can the funds be withdrawn?

    A. Wired funds must remain in the account for two business days. All check deposits will be held to current Scottrade policies.

    Q. Will day trading be allowed in cash accounts?

    A. Day trading in a cash account is generally prohibited. Day trades in a cash account can occur to the extent settled money is used and the trades do not violate the free-riding policy of the Federal Reserve Board governed under Regulation T.

    Q. Does the new day trading rule apply to options?

    A. Yes, it applies to all equities and options.

    Q. Will an account's status as a day trader be determined from September 28, 2001 forward, or will it be based on past activity?

    A. Accounts will be monitored from September 28, 2001 forward.

    Q. Once an account is coded as a "Pattern Day Trader", can the account be re-coded as a non day trading account?

    A. Once an account has been opened and has shown a history of day trading activity, it must remain a day trading account.

    I've discussed this rule with Scottrade in the past...They say that since and IRA acount cannot be marginable, you cannot Pattern Day Trade in that type of account regardless of how much money you have in it.

    But there is a way around it if you want to day trade...Simply open up multiple accounts. Although I normally day trade in a cash account w/ margin we also have 3 Tax accounts and I'm thinking about opening up a fourth after January 1st with a rollover. It won't give you unlimited day trading privileges, but you can make more.

    Hopefully I have not made any mistakes above...But if I have please feel free to correct me.

    Good Luck...Doug(IIC)
    "Trade What Is Happening...Not What You Think Is Gonna Happen"

    Find Tomorrow's Winners At SharpTraders.com

    Follow Me On Twitter

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nijmegen, NL
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    I split this thread off, from Where are you. If you have a question and you don't see and can't find an existing thread for it (hint: we have a Search function), it is perfectly acceptable, indeed preferable, to start a new thread. You can't do this when you are reading a thread, but when you step back to the forum view, you willl see the New Thread button.

    Regards,

    Karel
    Last edited by Karel; 12-18-2005 at 11:31 AM.
    My Investopedia portfolio
    (You need to have a (free) Investopedia or Facebook login, sorry!)

  10. #10

    Default

    Anyone know of any FREE software that does calculations on the P&L and schedule D??

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